Wednesday, April 14, 2010

AMBEDKAR JAYANTI


Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar also known as Babasaheb, was an Indian jurist, political leader, Buddhist activist, philosopher, thinker, anthropologist, historian, orator, prolific writer, economist, scholar, editor, revolutionary and a revivalist for Buddhism in India. He was also the chief architect of the Indian Constitution. Born into a poor Mahar, then untouchable family, Ambedkar spent his whole life fighting against social discrimination, the system of Chaturvarna — the categorization of Hindu society into four varnas — and the Hindu caste system. He is also credited with providing a spark for the conversion of hundreds of thousands of Dalits with his Ambedkar(ite) Buddhism. Ambedkar has been honoured with the Bharat Ratna, India's highest civilian award.



Overcoming numerous social and financial obstacles, Ambedkar became one of the first "Dalit" to obtain a college education in India. Eventually earning law degrees and multiple doctorates for his study and research in law, economics and political science from Columbia University and the London School of Economics, Ambedkar returned home as a famous scholar and practiced law for a few years before publishing journals advocating political rights and social freedom for India's untouchables. He is regarded as a Bodhisattva by Indian Buddhists even though he never claimed himself to be a Bodhisattva.







Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar was born in the British-founded town and military cantonment of Mhow in the Central Provinces (now in Madhya Pradesh). He was the 14th and last child of Ramji Maloji Sakpal and Bhimabai. His family was of Marathi background from the town of Ambavade in the Ratnagiri district of modern-day Maharashtra. They belonged to the Hindu, Mahar caste, who were treated as so called untouchables and subjected to intense socio-economic discrimination. Ambedkar's ancestors had for long been in the employment of the army of the British East India Company, and his father Ramji Sakpal served in the Indian Army at the Mhow cantonment. He had received a degree of formal education in Marathi and English, and encouraged his children to learn and work hard at school.

As a leading Indian scholar, Ambedkar had been invited to testify before the Southborough Committee, which was preparing the Government of India Act 1919. At this hearing, Ambedkar argued for creating separate electorates and reservations for Dalits and other religious communities. In 1920, he began the publication of the weekly Mooknayak (Leader of the Silent) in Mumbai. Attaining popularity, Ambedkar used this journal to criticize orthodox Hindu politicians and a perceived reluctance of the Indian political community to fight caste discrimination. His speech at a Depressed Classes Conference in Kolhapur impressed the local state ruler Shahu IV, who shocked orthodox society by dining with Ambekdar. Ambedkar established a successful legal practice, and also organised the Bahishkrit Hitakarini Sabha to promote education and socio-economic uplifting of the depressed classes.

By 1927, Dr. Ambedkar decided to launch active movements against untouchability. He began with public movements and marches to open up and share public drinking water resources; also he began a struggle for the right to enter Hindu temples. He led a satyagraha in Mahad to fight for the right of the untouchable community to draw water from the main water tank of the town. Ambedkar was appointed to the Bombay Presidency Committee to work with the all-European Simon Commission in 1925. This commission had sparked great protests across India, and while its report was ignored by most Indians, Ambedkar himself wrote a separate set of recommendations for future constitutional reformers.

In 1935, Ambedkar was appointed principal of the Government Law College, a position he held for two years. Settling in Mumbai, Ambedkar oversaw the construction of a large house, and stocked his personal library with more than 50,000 books. His wife Ramabai died after a long illness in the same year. It had been her long-standing wish to go on a pilgrimage to Pandharpur, but Ambedkar had refused to let her go, telling her that he would create a new Pandharpur for her instead of Hinduism's Pandharpur which treated them as untouchables. His own views and attitudes had hardened against orthodox Hindus, despite a significant increase in momentum across India for the fight against untouchability and he began criticizing them even as he was criticized himself by large numbers of Hindu activists. Speaking at the Yeola Conversion Conference on October 13 near Nasik, Ambedkar announced his intention to convert to a different religion and exhorted his followers to leave Hinduism.






In the 1950s, Ambedkar turned his attention to Buddhism and travelled to Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) to attend a convention of Buddhist scholars and monks While dedicating a new Buddhist vihara near Pune, Ambedkar announced that he was writing a book on Buddhism and that as soon as it was finished, he planned to make a formal conversion to Buddhism. Ambedkar twice visited Burma in 1954; the second time in order to attend the third conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists in Rangoon. In 1955, he founded the Bharatiya Bauddha Mahasabha, or the Buddhist Society of India. He completed his final work, The Buddha and His Dhamma, in 1956. It was published posthumously. Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar, the chief architect of the Constitution of India embraced Buddhism at the stupa at Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh.


Since 1948, Ambedkar had been suffering from diabetes. He was bed-ridden from June to October in 1954 owing to clinical depression and failing eyesight.[10] He had been increasingly embittered by political issues, which took a toll on his health. His health worsened as he furiously worked through 1955. Just three days after completing his final manuscript The Buddha and His Dhamma, it is said that Ambedkar died in his sleep on December 6, 1956 at his home in Delhi.

9 comments:

डॉ. रूपचन्द्र शास्त्री मयंक said...

बाबा साहब अम्बेदकर की जीवनी पढ़कर अच्छा लगा!
सुन्दर पोस्ट!

Gourav Agrawal said...

Great post :)

Ria said...

thanks for giving so much information.

R. Ramesh said...

beautiful piece yar...gr8 going babli..i am always heppy to visit yr blog...cheers:)

Tomz said...

Dr Ambedkar truly was a great person..

嘉雯 said...

Nice blog85cc,咆哮小老鼠,85街,免費影片,情趣爽翻天,愛戀情人用品,交友找啦咧,線上a片,女同志聊天室,sexy,色情網站,網愛聊天室,情色性愛貼圖,小穴,性愛姿勢,陰脣室,成人圖貼,性愛技巧,a片論壇,色情,85c,sexy網,人妻,脫衣,6k,18禁,手淫,性幻想,77p2p,情色,1007,85c,0401,後宮,色情,淫蕩,正妹,77p2p,ut室

nsiyer said...

He was a great man. The father of our constitution. You chose to write and acknowledge. That's great, Babli.

R Sudhir Kumar said...

Very rarely people prefer to write about Dr. Ambedkar. I am happy you have written a nice bio of this great man. My congragulatons to you Babli

शरद कोकास said...

उर्मि जी , आज कई दिनो बाद मैने यह पोस्ट देखी है , मै कह नही सकता मुझे इतना अच्छा लग रहा है कि आपकी प्रशंसा के लिये मेरे पास शब्द नही है। इसे अगले साल फिर पोस्ट करें ।